The Talent War

The Right Way to Read a Resume

By: Dr. Josh Cotton, George Randle and Mike Sarraille

Someone who sounds great on paper could end up being a disaster in the office, and someone with a lackluster resume could become one of your top performers.
Resumes are a valuable source of information, but only if you read them the right way. Instead of using resumes as a superficial screening tool, you need to dig deeper and read between the lines.

Read More

Two Is One, One Is None

By: Dan Bradley

How many jobs in your organization have the potential to become sole sources of failure? In other words, what roles can you not operate without? Some people might default to high-level leadership roles like President or CFO, but the most important roles might not be the ones you think of right off the bat.

Read More

Go to the Sound of the Guns

By: Shane Walsh

Solving problems, making difficult calls or resolving conflict are all challenging things, no matter how much leadership experience you have. And you’ll get it wrong sometimes. But when challenging circumstances present themselves or when a crisis arises, the leader’s job is to be present – to go to the sound of the guns.

Read More

The Biases You Face When Hiring

By: Dr. Josh Cotton, George Randle and Mike Sarraille

You are biased. It’s not a criticism, but a simple fact of life. We’re all biased and naturally drawn to the people who look and think like us.

You don’t want to hire what amounts to mini-me’s. Your company already has you. What it needs is people who are different from you, with different strengths and ways of thinking.

Read More

The Value of Failure

By: Dan Bradley

I truly believe that failure is the single most important factor in success. Not drive, not potential, not intelligence. Failure. Why? Because only those who have failed have persevered.

Read More

Mission, Pride, People: 3 Keys to Military and Corporate Success

By: Lisa Jaster

Military leadership offers plenty of lessons for corporate America, but those lessons must be taken with a grain of salt. The base of the organization—people— is significantly different in military and civilian environments. But regardless of which type of group you stand in front of, there are three critical drivers of success. Each organization must have a clear mission, a sense of unit pride, and a “people” first mentality. Build these three in your team and you will see success, whether it’s on the battlefield or at the office.

Read More

Reading List

The Talent War: How Special Operations and Great Organizations Win on Talent

Extreme Ownership: How U.S. Navy SEALs Lead and Win

The Attributes: 25 Hidden Drivers of Optimal Performance

Sign up to receive excerpts and human capital management advice from the Talent War Group – some of the most experienced and proven Special Operations, Military, and Business Leaders in the world.

You have Successfully Subscribed!